Publications and presentations

Chen Palmer is at the cutting edge of public law and employment law – so there’s always lots going on. Here you can find media releases, articles and presentations by us, and examples of our work in the news.

Education (Update) Amendment Bill – a brief summary of a not so brief Bill

26 Aug 2016 / Publications and presentations

On Monday 22 August 2016 the New Zealand Government introduced a bill in Parliament that seeks to undertake the biggest overhaul of New Zealand’s education system in 30 years.

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Dismissal of Senior Staff Justified for Non-disclosure of Key Personal Relationship

08 Aug 2016 / Publications and presentations

In a case which will reassure all employers who operate in environments where they owe duties of care to their students, a UK school principal was justifiably dismissed for failing to disclose that she was in a relationship with someone who had been convicted on child pornography charges.

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Mai Chen at Kea Inspire 2016

20 Jul 2016 / Publications and presentations

Watch Mai Chen's presentation at Kea Inspire 2016

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BYOD – Managing Information Security Risks and Personal Devices

08 Jun 2016 / Publications and presentations

Schools and teachers are used to managing large amounts of sensitive and personal information, particularly information about students and student achievement. With increasing pressure on teaching staff to work flexibly, and be available out of class time, the use of personal digital devices is increasing.

This brings potential gains in efficiency, productivity and creativity. However, the use of personal devices also creates risks to privacy and confidentiality, especially where personal information about students needs to be accessible as part of the job. Schools therefore need to ensure that all sensitive and personal information contained on teachers’ personal devices is held safely.

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The Health and Safety At Work Act 2015 Two Months In – How not to be a guinea pig

07 Jun 2016 / Publications and presentations

The Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (“HSWA”) came into force on 4 April 2016, heralding an overnight culture shift of health and safety in New Zealand workplaces. Suddenly, everyone in the workplace has a new health and safety title (PCBU and/or Officer and/or Worker) but unfortunately, our new titles did not come with instructions.

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Mai Chen named in Top 50 Diversity Figures in Public Life in Global Diversity List supported by The Economist

03 May 2016 / Publications and presentations

Mai Chen, Chair of the Superdiversity Centre for Law, Policy and Business, has been named on The Economist’s Top 50  Global Diversity List. Mai Chen is also Managing Partner at Chen Palmer Partners, Chair of New Zealand Asian Leaders, Adjunct Professor for the Faculty of Law at the University of Auckland, and a Director of the BNZ.

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Superdiversity Centre publications

04 Nov 2015 / Publications and presentations

The Superdiversity Centre for Law, Policy and Business held a successful launch of two publications last night in Auckland. The Superdiversity Stocktake: Implications for Business, Government and New Zealand and Superdiversity, Democracy and New Zealand’s Electoral and Referenda Laws are available online for free at www.superdiversity.org

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Public Law Toolbox Conference Programme

30 Apr 2012 / Publications and presentations

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Drug Testing of Employees

27 Apr 2012 / Publications and presentations

Drug testing of employees

A recent ruling by Fair Work Australia has found that making employees submit to urine tests for drug use is “unjust and unreasonable” as the tests can detect drug usage from the weekend. This may have no bearing on an employee’s ability to do their job safely. 

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Conflicts of Interest

27 Apr 2012 / Publications and presentations

Conflicts of Interest

Nick Smith resigned as a result of letters written in his capacity as ACC Minister.  Bronwyn Pullar, friend and former National Party official, approached Mr Smith in 2010 for help with her ACC claim.  As a loyal friend, he accepted.  So what’s the problem and why did he have to go?

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